Monday, May 7, 2012


This chewy loaf, with its deep-brown crust, can be made in two versions: with rich, deep, flavor, and very mild tang; or with assertive sour flavor, typical of a San Francisco sourdough loaf. 
Since I went to a class about sourdough, at King Arthur flour center, I have this "starter" from there that I maintain in refrigerator. Twice a week I have to discard 1cup of starter and feed again the "starter"=yeast, with 4oz flour and 4 oz water. I found this recipe at the blog of  King Arthur flour, using the 1 cup that I discard anyhow, from my "starter".
This makes me good, I don't trough any dough!


 •            1 cup  sourdough starter (My Note: I used the "discarded "cup, unfed, from refrigerator)
•             1 1/2 cups lukewarm water
•             2 teaspoons yeast
•             1 tablespoon sugar
•             2 1/2 teaspoons salt
•             5 cups all-purpose flour

 My Note: this time I used 4 cups all purpose flour + 1 cup rye flour. In this case, as I learn in class, I add 4 table spoons of warm water, so the dough will be soft and silky as the white flour dough, will be.


1) Combine all of the ingredients, kneading to form smooth dough.
My note: I use the bread machine to knead and first rise. The dough rise a lot in the machine!But you can use manual knead and rise at room temp, if you chose....


2) Allow the dough to rise, in a covered bowl, until it's doubled in size, about 90 minutes.
3) Gently divide the dough in half; it'll deflate somewhat.
  4) Gently shape the dough into two oval loaves; or, for longer loaves, two 10" to 11" logs. 

5) Place the loaves on a lightly greased or parchment-lined baking sheet. Cover and let rise until very puffy, about 1 hour.
6) Towards the end of the rising time, preheat the oven to 425°F.
7) Spray the loaves with lukewarm water.
8) Make two fairly deep diagonal slashes in each; a serrated bread knife, wielded firmly, works well here.
9) Bake the bread for 25 to 30 minutes, until it's a very deep golden brown. Remove it from the oven, and cool on a rack.


My Note:
I use this dough bread machine to bake, because one night I didn't have time to deal with the dough, shaping, raising, and baking. I got a very good tall bread, tasty and firm crumbs.



As a child my mother would make this tart and she was very happy to tell us that is a very famous Austrian tart  named after the town...